L.S. Hilton on Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh

“It’s about religion, it’s about aesthetics, it’s about love and it’s about tragedy.” L.S. Hilton, 41, writer, London (UK).

L.S. Hilton on her book Maestra

“It answers a really serious literary question: why should sociopaths have to be badly dressed? Sex, murder, shoes, it’s got the lot.” L.S. Hilton, 41, writer, London (UK).

Mirna Funk on In summer all cities stink – Menno Wigman

“I unfortunately lived thirty-five years without knowing Menno Wigman. His poems are amazing.” Mirna Funk, 35, writer, journalist, Berlin (DE), Tel Aviv (IL).

Mirna Funk on her book Winternähe

“Every human being is made through his own story: a personal story, a family story or even a story of a country.” Mirna Funk, 35, writer, journalist, Berlin (DE), Tel Aviv (IL).

Karen Köhler on Wij – Elvis Peeters

“It’s not only a book I love, it’s also a book I hate.” Karen Köhler, 42, writer, Hamburg (DE).

Karen Köhler on her book Wir haben Raketen geangelt

“I really put all the love and all the effort in it that I could at that time.” Karin Köhler, 42, writer, Hamburg (DE).

Samuel Bjørk on American psycho – Bret Easton Ellis

“I never read a book that made me so physically interested; my body was somewhat shivering when I read it.” Samuel Bjørk, 46, writer, Norway.

Per Leo on The darkroom of Damocles – Willem Frederik Hermans

“The reader is really disturbed in the end and he loses the feeling of what is right and what is wrong.” Per Leo, 43, writer, Berlin (DE).

Per Leo on his book Flood and Soil

“It was supposed to be a non-fiction book, but it turned out to be a piece of literature.” Per Leo, 43, writer, Berlin (DE).

Ann Marie MacDonald on Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

“Jane Eyre fired my child’s imagination at twelve and it has been an abiding source of literary and personal inspiration to this day.” Ann-Marie MacDonald, 56, writer, Toronto.

Annegien van Doorn on her book In passing

“Why I loved making this book is because it shows a different perception of our everyday life.” Annegien van Doorn, 33, photographer, Amsterdam.

Paul Bühre over De naam van de wind – Patrick Rothfuss

“It’s great, I don’t know how to explain, but it’s really awesome. You just keep reading, you want to know how it goes on.” Paul Bühre, 16, scholier, Berlijn (Duitsland).